Events


APR
18
Date:
Thursday, 18 Apr 2019
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location:
302 International Center
Department:
Office for Education Abroad
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This conversation will critically examine education abroad from participants we hear little about in current literature.
 
Dr. Qiana Green, MSU Residence Education Assistant Director, will share major findings from her dissertation, which explored how Black graduate student women made meaning of their education abroad experiences.
 
Her research challenges us to think more deeply about education abroad as it pertains to social positionality; teaching and learning; and global power and privilege.
 
She will share how she approached her research topic, what she learned, and in what ways these findings can assist all of us engaged in education abroad.
Date:
Thursday, 18 Apr 2019
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:
Room 201, International Center
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About the Talk:
For some, the idea of an Islamic state serves to fulfill aspirations for cultural sovereignty and new forms of ethical political practice. For others, it violates the proper domains of both religion and politics. Yet, while there has been much discussion of the idea and ideals of the Islamic state, its possibilities and impossibilities, surprisingly little has been written about how this political formation is staged and experienced in the cloud of contingencies that make up modern political life. Based on more than ten years of fieldwork in the Republic of Sudan, this lecture will examine the nature of an Islamic state by exploring its formation not only as a political ideal, but as an aesthetic and epistemic provocation, at the culmination of
a particularly unstable period of Sudanese history. Paying particular attention to the
intricate means through which the desire for Islamic politics is produced and sustained, this talk goes beyond the often speculative conclusions about Islamic politics as a response to the West, and examines it as a node in a much deeper conversation within Islamic thought, augmented and reworked as Sudan's own Islamist experiment became an object of debate and controversy. Reading from and reflecting on his recent book, For Love of the Prophet: An Ethnography of Sudan's Islamic State, Salomon will use the painting that appears on its cover as a mechanism to interrogate our scholarly understanding of Islamic politics, reassessing the categories commonly used to evaluate and understand it.
 
About the Speaker:
 
Noah Salomon teaches courses in Islamic Studies and the anthropology of religion at
Carleton College. His first book, For Love of the Prophet: An Ethnography of Sudan's Islamic State, was published by Princeton University Press in 2016. Other recent research has focused on the establishment of state secularism in South Sudan as a mode of unraveling the Islamic State, and the concomitant construction of a Muslim minority as part of a nascent project of nation-building. Salomon was a member at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton) in the School of Social Science for the 2013–14 academic year and has been part of recent collaborative grants from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (on Islamic epistemologies in Africa) and the Islam Research Programme, Netherlands (on religious minorities in the two Sudans following partition).
 
*This talk is co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology and the Muslim Studies Program*
Date:
Thursday, 18 Apr 2019
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
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Noah Salomon (Carleton College)

will present on

"For Love of the Prophet: The Art of Islamic State-Making in Sudan"

 

Noah Salomon Bios:

Africana Studies
Noah Salomon (B.A., Reed College; M.A., Ph.D. University of Chicago) teaches courses in Islamic Studies and the anthropology of religion. His first book, For Love of the Prophet: An Ethnography of Sudan's Islamic State, was published by Princeton University Press in 2016. Other recent research has focused on the establishment of state secularism in South Sudan as a mode of unraveling the Islamic State, and the concomitant construction of a Muslim minority as part of a nascent project of nation-building. Salomon was a member at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton) in the School of Social Science for the 2013–14 academic year and has been part of recent collaborative grants from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (on Islamic epistemologies in Africa) and the Islam Research Programme, Netherlands (on religious minorities in the two Sudans following partition). Faculty Website

Middle East Studies
Noah Salomon (B.A., Reed College; M.A., Ph.D. University of Chicago) teaches courses in Islamic Studies and the anthropology of religion. His first book, For Love of the Prophet: An Ethnography of Sudan's Islamic State, was published by Princeton University Press in 2016. Other recent research has focused on the establishment of state secularism in South Sudan as a mode of unraveling the Islamic State, and the concomitant construction of a Muslim minority as part of a nascent project of nation-building. Salomon was a member at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton) in the School of Social Science for the 2013–14 academic year and has been part of recent collaborative grants from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (on Islamic epistemologies in Africa) and the Islam Research Programme, Netherlands (on religious minorities in the two Sudans following partition). Faculty Website

Cosponsored event with the African Studies Center Eye on Africa Series

Date:
Thursday, 18 Apr 2019
Time:
5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
302 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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The Hindi-Urdu Language Club presents English Vinglish, a 2012 Indian comedy-drama film, written and directed by Gauri Shinde. The narrative revolves around a woman named Shashi, a small entrepreneur who makes snacks. Shashi enrolls in an English-speaking course to stop her husband and daughter mocking her lack of English skills and gains self-respect in the process. The protagonist, played by Sridevi, was inspired by Shinde's mother. 

APR
19
Date:
Friday, 19 Apr 2019
Time:
8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Location:
Room 303 International Center
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The Year of Global Africa presents From the Ground Up: Improving Soil Health in Africa through Partnership.

This symposium aims to share the most current research by MSU faculty and students on soil health. The two major goals of the symposium are to share the research work with the general public; and bring collaboration opportunities for faculty and students from different scientific disciplines. The symposium will be part of the Africa R&D Connect series and composed of a keynote, two panel discussions, oral and poster presentations.

Opening Keynote speaker Dr. Saweda Liverpool-Tasie, Associate Professor of Agriculture, Food and Resource Economics; "Frontiers in Soil Health" panelists Drs. Cynthia Donovan, Lisa Tiemann, Joseph P. Messina, Timothy Harrigan, and moderated by Dr. Anne Ferguson ; "Soil Health Partnership" panelists Drs. Wenda Bauchspies, Leo Zulu and Nicole Mason-Wardell, and moderated by Dr. Jennifer Olson; closing keynote speaker Dr. Sieglinde Snapp, Professor of Plant, Soil and Microbial Science.

Land degradation in Africa has been identified as one of the major crises for food security in recent decades. With limited access to expensive inorganic fertilizer and land degradation, farmers are struggling to improve crop productivity. To achieve high crop productivity while maintaining soil nutrients, researchers need to better understand and improve the soil health. MSU faculty and students from department of geography, plant soil, and microbial sciences, agricultural economics, community sustainability, and statistics are collaborating with scholars and students from Malawi, Ghana, Tanzania, and Nigeria on cutting edge research that benefit African soil health through multiple pathways.

RSVP by filling out the registration form.

This symposium is supported in part by a Year of Global Africa mini-grant.
 
Date:
Friday, 19 Apr 2019
Time:
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Location:
Spartan Rooms B&C (International Center Food Court)
Department:
Office for International Students and Scholars
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The Annual International Scholar Showcase provides international scholars an opportunity to share their work, creative or scholarly, with the MSU community. Learn about what research and work are being conducted on-campus, connect with your fellow international scholars, colleagues and academic departments.

 
The event will be held on Friday, April 19th from 4-6pm and is free and is open to the public. Refreshments will be provided!
 
Date:
Friday, 19 Apr 2019
Time:
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Location:
International Center Spartan Rooms B&C (inside the food court)
Department:
Office for International Students and Scholars
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Join us for OISS Weekly Coffee Hour! It's a great place to make friends, network, be involved and start the weekend. And free coffee and tea are always provided!

APR
21
Date:
Sunday, 21 Apr 2019
Time:
4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
Fairchild Auditorium,
Department:
Asian Studies Center
APR
22
Date:
Monday, 22 Apr 2019
Time:
11:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
302 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Connor Plensdorf, a candidate for a M.S. in Geography from the Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences, will be hosting a public forum for presenting his thesis topic. Join us as we discover the techniques and skills that are involved in identifying missile test sites in the DPRK. 

Date:
Monday, 22 Apr 2019
Time:
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
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Modern Muslim Theology

Martin Nguyen of Fairfield University

Dr. Martin Nguyen is Associate Professor of Islamic Religious Traditions in the Religious Studies Department, Faculty Chair for Diversity, and Director of the Islamic World Studies Minor Program at Fairfield University. He received his B.A. in Religious Studies and History from the University of Virginia and then went on to earn a Masters of Theological Studies (M.T.S.) from the Harvard Divinity School. Following this, he joined the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University where he completed a joint-program Ph.D. in Middle Eastern Studies and History.

His latest book Modern Muslim Theology: Engaging God and the World with Faith and Imagination (Rowman & Littlefield, 2018) presents a contemporary theological framework rooted in the practice of the religious imagination. Concerned with cultivating a life of faith and righteousness for the present, the book re-conceptualizes key religious ideas, like revelation, tradition, and prayer, through an array of theological approaches (figurative, historical, narrative, and practical).

His first book Sufi Master and Qur'an Scholar: Abu'l-Qasim al-Qushayri and the Lata'if al-isharat (Oxford University Press, 2012) explores the confluence of Qur'anic exegesis, theology, and Sufism in the life of al-Qushayri, a prominent mystic and scholar of 5th/11th century Nishapur. In addition, he has published a number of articles and chapters on the Qur'an and its interpretation, Muslim theology, Islamic spirituality, pedagogy, and issues of race.

He serves on the editorial board of the journal Teaching Theology and Religion and is a  contributor to the Wabash Center's blog "Teaching Islam."  In his hometown of Stratford, he is involved with a community activist group called Stratford CARE (Citizens Addressing Racial Equity) where he is establishing "Stratford CARE Story Share," a town-wide oral history project.